Seven Signs Your School Needs a New Website

Seven Signs Your School Needs a New Website

When college websites first came online, they had a dozen or so pages to give visitors an interactive overview of the school. It felt like a mashup of several flyers, including the college’s history, academic programs, campus life, and an application form. Several iterations later, it morphed into a digital version of the viewbook, which was fine and well until departments and schools were allowed to create their own web pages. Suddenly, everyone was a webmaster and a marketing guru.

Creating Better Content for Prospective Students

Creating Better Content for Prospective Students

A recent study by the Content Marketing Institute revealed that only 8 percent of marketers feel their content is “very effective.” At the same time, 65 percent of marketers admitted that they don’t have a written document of content strategy, and about one third of those who do have a documented strategy say they follow it “very closely.” Correlation? You bet.

Ready for Change: The Teacher Becomes the Student

One Adult Student’s Story: The Teacher Becomes the Student

Henry lives a double life. By day, he’s a high school math teacher. By night (and on weekends), he’s a computer programmer—at least he’d like to be. When he’s not grading math homework or preparing lesson plans, he does everything from building and fixing computers to coding to building apps. The reason he isn’t a programmer is simple: he didn’t know he loved computers until fairly recently.

The Case for Strategic Content

The Case for Strategic Content

“Content marketing.” “Inbound marketing.” “Native advertising.” “Branded content.” “Retargeting.” “Social marketing.” For enrollment professionals, it’s a dizzying array of terminologies, definitions, and fine distinctions. If you’ve been reading the “content” blogs and Twitter streams over the past few weeks, you’ve noticed some spirited discussion about the definition of content marketing.